The Telegraph
Saturday , March 10 , 2012
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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CIMA Gallary
States of the nation
General elections are all-India affairs, with citizens in 28 states taking part to elect a new Parliament. On the other hand, elections to legislative assemblies have a particular resonance for the citizens of the state, or states, going to the polls...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Justice denied
Sir — The action of the men in black coats — individuals who are supposed to fight for justice for ...  | Read.. 
 
Friend in deed
Sir — One morning, I hired a taxi from Howrah and reached my residence at Behala by 10 am. On ...  | Read.. 
 
Parting shot
Sir — The scarcity of liquefied petroleum gas cylinders has become a major problem for the people ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
A DIFFERENT WAY
When proposed solutions keep coming in a stream, it may be that the problem is insoluble. Or that the nub of the problem is ...| Read.. 
 
REVIEW ARTS
Slippery borders of the familiar
It is a disorienting and, at the same time, a curiously gripping experience to walk into Nightshade, an exhibition of photographs by Natasha de Betak, presented by ...  | Read.. 
 
Leaning on the natural world
The three artists who exhibited their paintings at Chemould Art Gallery recently called the show, simply, Triumvirate. But the name can be seen as something of a ...  | Read.. 
 
Scenes from a marriage
Among the nine finalists for the seventh Mahindra Excellence in Theatre Awards held in Delhi this month, two were nominated from Bengal — Arghya’s Journey to Dakghar ...  | Read.. 
 
THIS ABOVE ALL
That place called home
I have a large number of relatives and friends who have settled abroad — mostly in England, Italy, France, Germany, Canada,...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
[P]erhaps nothing ‘ud be a lesson to us if it didn’t come too late. It’s well we should feel as life’s a reckoning we can’t make twice over; there’s no real making amends in this world, any more nor you can mend a wrong subtraction by doing your addition right. — GEORGE ELIOT