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BCCI didn’t handle issue well, says Kapil

New Delhi: Kapil Dev has criticised the way BCCI handled the Team India captaincy issue, adding that it could have created “uneasiness” among the players.

“I am not happy with the way the board dealt with the captaincy issue, they should have dealt with it better. The same thing had happened some years ago,” the 1983 World Cup-winning captain said, probably referring to his own playing days when he and Sunil Gavaskar were made to play a game of musical chairs.

The recent episode saw Rahul Dravid being appointed skipper for the tri-series in Sri Lanka as Sourav Ganguly was serving a ban. The left-hander has been reinstated for the tour of Zimbabwe where India will play a tri-series and two Tests.

“There can be a little uneasiness in players if the captain is changed suddenly. But I hope the players are sensible enough, they will let the phase pass off,” Kapil said.

Asked if Sourav was the right choice, Kapil avoided a direct reply. “Our opinion is not important. If it is good for the team, fair enough. Sourav has to get runs' If he gets runs, he should be in the team and if he is in the team, he should be the captain.”

Kapil was forthcoming on the selectors’ preference to youth over experience for the Zimbabwe tri-series squad.

Referring in particular to V.V.S. Laxman, who failed to find a place in the ODI squad, he said: “He is not one of the best fielders in the side, he is not like Yuvraj Singh or Mohammed Kaif. Certain things are against him. He has done so much for the country but you can’t keep everybody in the team.”

Asked about the team’s slide down the performance chart, Kapil said, “the media wrote so highly about the team last year, they hailed (John) Wright. Tshey should now explain, if he was a good coach why was he sacked'”

Kapil, himself a former national coach, said ample time should be given to Greg Chappell before making any judgment on the Aussie’s coaching capabilities.

“We have to give him time, support him all the way. You cannot judge him on the basis of just one or two series.”

The Wisden Cricketer of the Century was critical about the experimental rules introduced in one-day Internationals by the ICC.

“These rules should have first been applied to first-class cricket. It’s not right to experiment at the highest level.”

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