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Food & clothes add zing to Id fun

- Kids make most of occasion; traditional delicacies steal hearts on festival

Chowk Shikarpur resident Tarannum Parveen (25) lost her six-month-old baby Sara to typhoid last month but made up her mind to celebrate Id-ul-Fitr on Tuesday so that elder daughter Shifa did not miss out on the excitement like other children of her age.

Tarannum said: “The positivity of the festival is such that even if a person is going through a tough phase, he/she would celebrate the occasion within his/her own capacity. The poor cannot afford to prepare delicacies but even they celebrate by preparing at least sewai and sharing it with near and dear ones.”

She added: “Id comes just once a year and for children like Shifa, it is the perfect time to make merry. Though we did not buy clothes according to the Id tradition, Shipha’s father took her to market and bought her five dresses yesterday (Monday).”

Tarannum also made traditional delicacies. “Today (Tuesday), I prepared sheer korma (made from vermicelli, milk, dry fruits and khoya), tikki chaat, chhola, naan, shahi chicken. From spicy to sweet, we try to include all kinds of tastes in our menu to please our guests,” said Tarannum.

Most members of the community claimed that food definitely held an important part in the festivities.

Alamganj resident Kausar Jahan (28) said she woke up early to prepare the delicacies on the occasion. “Shahi zarba, sheer korma, roasted chicken and biryani are on the menu in our house today (Tuesday). No celebration can be complete without good food, the same applies to Id as well. I have cooked considering the taste of both my Hindu and Muslim guests. I have kept the quantity of chicken dishes less, as my Hindu friends won’t savour it in Shravan.”

Kausar insisted that wearing new dresses was the norm on Id for which she shopped in advance.

“The best thing about this festival is that we spend money without keeping account how much we actually do. Id gives us the freedom of buying anything we want. For housewives like me, that is good enough reason to love this festival the most. I demanded salwar suits from my husband which he did,” she said.

Children also made the most of the occasion. The idi (the money elders give to people as blessings on Id) made their day. Seven-year-old Sadiyan, a resident of Mahendru, was ecstatic at having collected Rs 1,000 as idi by 2pm on Tuesday. “I got idi from my uncles and aunts but I am yet to get it from my mother’s side of the family. They would come in the evening and I would make some more money,” said Sadiya.

Around 13,200 revellers, double the figure on normal days, visited the zoo on Tuesday. The faithfuls started the day by offering Id ki namaz (prayer) at 8am after which they hugged and greeted each other. Later, they visited the residences of friends and relatives and gorged on the delicacies offered.

“The Ramazan fasting ends with a big feast on Id. The celebration helps us get closer to our near and dear ones, as we get to spend valuable time with them on this occasion,” said Rubina Khan (36), a resident of Boring Road.

Chief minister Jitan Ram Manjhi wished the people on Id and prayed for the state’s progress. He joined a large number of people in offering namaz at Gandhi Maidan. He visited the Khanqah Mujibia and Imarat Shariah in Phulwarisharif later to pray for the peace and prosperity of the people. Food and civil supplies minister Shyam Rajak accompanied him. Manjhi told reporters that he dreamt of progress of all communities through the eradication of social ills such as illiteracy.