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Drizzle fells MGM’s big-budget boundary

State-run Mahatma Gandhi Memorial (MGM) Medical College and Hospital in Sakchi, Jamshedpur, is doing a crash course every month.

After crumbling cornice concrete at the medical block brought down an air-conditioner 35ft to the ground on June 20, a 100-feet-long portion of the heal hub boundary, rebuilt for Rs 25 lakh not too long ago, collapsed on a sidewalk on Thursday morning, scaring away not many but a teenaged boy taking a pee.

The seven-feet-high wall, which crashed on the new civil court side around 10.30am apparently after an overnight drizzle, might not have injured anyone, but once again exposed the festering wound of the government hospital where repairs are but a sham.

A stationary trailer and a truck were partially damaged in brick and mortar shower.

Insiders at MGM hospital said the boundary had been raised a year ago for Rs 25 lakh, a part of the Rs 5.5-crore repair and renovation project sanctioned by the health department in 2013 and which ended in March 2014.

Four separate civil contractors had been roped in for the boundary wall job on the seven-acre hospital premises.

Principal of MGM Medical College in Dimna A.N. Mishra, who doubles up as the superintendent of the hospital, inspected the collapse site in the morning. “I have to find out which contractor had constructed the portion that crashed. I am afraid of a rerun seeing the condition of the damaged boundary, other lengths of which may collapse if it rains heavily,” he said.

Those who know a thing or two about civil constructions and had had a closer look at the fallen boundary wall on Thursday blamed poor mix of cement and sand.

“The foundation was deep, but the work of poor quality,” one of them said.

Mishra was also prompted to add that he would write to the engineering cell of the department of medical education, urging a thorough inspection of all buildings on the premises, most of which were renovated over the past year.

“The department looks after building construction and maintenance of medical colleges and hospitals. An inspection will reveal if any other structure is as vulnerable during monsoon,” he said.

A senior administrative official of the hospital had earlier underscored that a similar accident was waiting to happen at the surgical block. “This building was repaired by civil contractor Pappu Khan for Rs 86 lakh. It has been whitewashed and yet cracks are still visible on the outside walls,” he had claimed.

The hospital superintendent added that he would summon the contractor concerned and “make him rebuild” the collapsed structure.