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Kolhan varsity mulls fair quota in poll

It’s an issue that makes waves from the panchayat right up to the Parliament. And now, Kolhan University (KU) is also giving it a fair thought.

As the varsity plans to conduct its first-ever students’ union election this September, reservation for girl candidates looks like a plausible option.

Members of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) and some other students from various colleges under the university have proposed the idea, which officials have promised to consider.

“Some students had approached me when I was on a visit to the steel city. This is a good idea and we can always consider it. However, we have to analyse the Lyngdoh Committee Recommendations to see what it says. We will anyway send this proposal to the chancellor of universities soon and if he passes the regulation, we will be good to go,” said Kolhan University vice chancellor R.P.P. Singh.

According to him, such a move can act as a motivation for young girls to join politics and prove their mettle.

He added that the initiative was basically a baby step towards letting girls take leadership challenges.

According to students’ union activists, girls are less interested in politics in colleges under Kolhan University. They prefer to stay away from campus politics as they perceive it in a bad light.

“There are many reasons why we proposed the idea to vice-chancellor Singh. First, girls are not interested in politics and we must engage them in campus democracy. Many girl will be able to realise their latent leadership potential. But, what needs to change at the earliest is the perception among girl students that politics is not their cup of tea and students who take part in such activities are campus goons,” said Rakesh Pandey, an ABVP supporter.

But, not all girls feel the same way. A vocal few do nurture political ambitions.

“Students here are quite active in politics. The violence, which is synonymous with politics, scares girls away. But if there is reservation for girl candidates, students politics can get better, cleaner and more serious,” said Surbhi Kumari, a history student of JKS College in Mango.

“For girls who want to test political mettle, reservation can be a golden opportunity. Girls will get a chance to work for the welfare of the varsity, their respective colleges as well as the student community,” said a student leader.

Set up in 2009, KU has been trying to conduct students’ union elections since inception. But this time, the possibility of holding the poll is high.

In Jharkhand, representation of women in politics needs to increase, feel many. Not a single woman won Lok Sabha polls this year. All 14 MPs are men.


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