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Louis’s tactics pay off

Porto Alegre: After exacting revenge against holders Spain in their World Cup opener, The Netherlands turned their sights on settling an old score with Australia, finally getting the better of the Socceroos on a sunny Wednesday at Beira Rio stadium.

The Dutch had not beaten Australia in three previous meetings but that oversight was corrected with a thrilling 3-2 World Cup Group B win secured by a long-range strike from substitute Memphis Depay. “I was not surprised because I believe Australia is a tough team to play against, well organised and this coach (Ange Postecoglou) is very good,” said Netherlands coach Louis van Gaal.

“He allows his team to play an attacking game, he exercises pressure and that is difficult for any team. I wasn’t surprised (by Australia) but I was surprised by our careless ball possession.”

For all their goal-scoring brilliance, it was the Dutch ability to change tactics on the fly that earned victory over the energetic and determined Australians. After starting the match with 5-3-3 formation, Van Gaal made a tactical change at half-time, switching to the Dutch classic 1-4-3-3 line-up and the swap proved a stroke of genius — although the Dutch coach saw it as a gamble.

“I felt that Australia in the first half was the most dominating team and I wanted to change that and I was thinking better to change that at half-time,” he explained.

“I took the risk and at half-time I would explain how to play a 1-4-3-3 system, this is the natural formation that every Dutch guy has grown up with and we can always switch over to that system,” he said.

“I felt that in the second half this worked out much better and there was more pressure on the ball and we created many more opportunities so that was the solution against Australia.

“As a coach I needed to change something at half-time in order to boost their confidence. I had to change their mindset. Fortunately it turned out ok but it could have just as well turned out differently,” he added.