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Help-society mantra unites cycle enthusiasts

- Six cyclists from different parts of the globe come together to travel around the world

Golaghat, June 15: They are from different countries but united by a cause — to help society by cycling around the globe.

Mike Ray and Chris Buchman from the US, Kim Mim Sung from South Korea, Daniella Bosch from Switzerland, Katya Zibec of Slovenia and Mirko Kadlec of the Czech Republic arrived here on Friday en route to Majuli, the seat of Vaishnavite culture.

The six have so far cycled through the Asian Highway (AH-1) covering three nations, Thailand, where they first met, Vietnam and Myanmar. As of now, the trip for the newly formed group has just begun though, for they are intent on going to more places and meeting more people.

“We started our journey from different parts of the world and it is in Bangkok where all of us met for the first time and from there on we are continuing our journey as a group. We left Yangon on May 10 and covered a distance of 80-100km on an average per day,” Mike told The Telegraph.

On choosing the bicycle as a mode of their expedition, Chris said it is just an incredibly low-impact, localising, interactive, intimate, and accessible form of transportation. “And at the same time, rather than inefficiently stripping resources from the earth and using them to spew forth waste and pollution, you are taking only what you really need while moving at a pace that allows you to contribute to the communities you travel through.”

Chris plans to ride his bicycle 14,000 miles from Thailand to Turkey to raise funds to rescue North Korean refugees. “I hope to raise $1 per mile, or $14,000, which I think is more than enough to rescue five refugees,” he said.

Katya and Mirko, who are husband and wife, have been exploring the planet on bicycles since 2002. In order to support themselves, they make hand-made jewellery inspired by the places they visit, from all natural materials that they gather, and sell while they are on the road.

Mike, who has his own three rules — no gas, no meat and no trash — said he loved to help people and protect the environment. “My three rules are certainly not universal. Still I think they generally keep me doing more good than harm and if during the course of my travel I can change one person’s world, it will have been time well spent,” Mike said.

The group left Nambor Guest House here this morning for Majuli after which they will go to Tawang, he added.