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Chaos marks start of DU admission season

New Delhi, June 2: Distribution of admission forms for about 54,000 seats in 70 colleges under Delhi University began in the national capital today amid chaos and confusion.

On Day 1, around 32,460 common admission OMR forms were sold offline, while 3,129 completed forms were submitted. However, only 2,305 admission seekers to the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) could fill the forms online as the DU website crashed owing to heavy traffic, said deputy dean (students’ welfare) Malay Neerav.

The offline forms are available at 18 information centres on the north and south campuses of the university, while the online forms are available on the DU website and also through an Android App, “DU UG admissions 2014”, designed by a varsity professor.

With over 50,000 students having secured more than 90 per cent marks in CBSE Class XII examinations this year, cut-off for various colleges are expected to soar even higher than the last year.

As anxious parents and students reached the information centres early this morning to buy forms, there was a great deal of confusion regarding the DU’s new rules for calculating marks and the subjects that they can use in the “best of four” calculation. Despite several guidelines issued by the varsity that students only have to give choices of subjects, students were facing the common dilemma — if a college is more important or a course.

Adding to the intense competition for seats is the confusion and scepticism surrounding the centralised forms, which are available online as well as at 18 designated DU centres. The optical mark recognition (OMR) forms, as they are known, are applicable for all colleges, except St. Stephen’s and Jesus & Mary College which have their own admission process and only accept online forms.

Although the university started its online registration process for the undergraduate admissions at the midnight on Monday, the website crashed. This is the third consecutive year when aspirants faced problems in filling online forms.

Daulat Ram College, one of the centres on the north campus, stopped selling forms for a few hours following protests by candidates who were not allowed to enter the premises.

“We had to study so hard to get good marks in Class XII so that we could secure a seat here. But the admission process is so complicated. Also, in this heat it is so cumbersome to buy and submit forms,” said Aastha Srivastava, a DU aspirant.