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Spotlight on ACSU officer

New Delhi: In what could be an embarrassment for the International Cricket Council (ICC), a top official of its Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU) unit has allegedly been found to have links with an Indian bookmaker during the World T20, held in Bangladesh earlier this year.

A Dhaka-based television channel Bangla Tribune Tuesday released audio tapes of an alleged conversation between an ICC ASCU officer from India and an alleged bookie during the World T20.

The channel claimed that the bookie was arrested by Dhaka police, but was later released on the request of the ICC officer, who told the officials that the former was his informer.

“Based on audio surveillance records, the bookie was arrested in April, following which he provided key information about match-fixing in cricket,” the channel said.

The ASCU official refused to comment on the alleged conversation, saying that it was for the ICC to react on such issues. The ICC has not given any official reaction on the matter.

The conversation between the bookie and the official was also shown by an Indian channel which, however, made it clear that they did not vouch for its veracity.

In the conversation, the ACSU official was telling the bookie to be careful and leave Bangladesh immediately as his presence has already been noticed.

The official was also heard telling the bookie that his presence has created a mess and it could be difficult to defend him.

“You better leave this place because you are now a marked face and you can be easily be identified... Better you leave this place before somebody recognises you,” the official was quoted as saying by the channel.

The turmoil cricket has been going through, thanks to fixing allegation, doesn’t seem to end.

Brendon McCullum has reportedly alleged that he was approached by a well-known former player to fix matches in 2008. McCullum said that the former player, whom he described as “a hero who became a friend”, offered him up to 107,000 ($180,000) to under-perform.