TT Epaper
The Telegraph
Graphiti
 
CIMA Gallary

Tribute to Kohima’s bravehearts

- British delegation visits Jotsoma to witness unveiling of war memorial

Kohima, April 16: Jotsoma today recalled the heroics of a British general and his bravehearts during the Battle of Kohima.

Seventy years after Maj. Gen. John M.L. Grover and his team of British soldiers prevented the Japanese from invading Jotsoma, around 6km from here, the residents of the hamlet paid tribute to them.

The battle of Kohima lasted 62 days, after which the 31 division of the Japanese Army under Lt Gen. Kotuku Sato had retreated.

Brig. G.K. Bibby of the British Army today unveiled a huge monolith erected in memory of Gen. Grover, GOC of 2nd Division, 33 corps, on the occasion of 70 years of the Battle of Kohima. A 20-member delegation of British soldiers led by Brig. Bibby also visited a World War II museum here.

The daughter-in-law of the late general, Celia Grover, thanked the people of Jotsoma.

“Because of this initiative of the people of Jotsoma, the world will forever remember my father-in-law who had led the British Army in defeating the Japanese soldiers,” she said.

The village authorities of Jotsoma also hosted a community feast. The team later visited Mount Puliebadze where Gen. Grover’s soldiers had camped.

Brig. Bibby thanked the villagers of Jotsoma, adding that they would never forget the supreme sacrifice made by them.

He said there is a Kohima War Memorial at York in Britain where war veterans come and pay tribute to their fallen comrades. He also presented a framed photo of the Kohima war memorial to the villagers.

“Our sincere intention is to recall the supreme sacrifice of the general and his valiant soldiers and the past deeds of benevolence and friendship between the British troops and the people of Jotsoma during World War II. We also want to keep those beautiful stories alive,” said Krurovi Peseyie, the chairman of the monument committee.

He said the villagers had been privileged to help the British soldiers as guides, stretcher-bearers and porters.

Many villagers from Jotsoma had served the British government in the army and in civil administration.

Sepoy Vikeyienyu Nagi, who had assisted the British soldiers during the war, received a present from the visiting British soldiers. “No nation has the right to invade other nations as every country has its right to freedom, right to territory and ownership,” he said.

any villagers from Jotsoma had served the British government in the army and in civil administration.

Sepoy Vikeyienyu Nagi, who had assisted the British soldiers during the war, received a present from the visiting British soldiers. “No nation has the right to invade other nations as every country has its right to freedom, right to territory and ownership,” he said.

A booklet, Historic Battle of Kohima 1944, was also released on the occasion.


 More stories in Northeast

  • Election rigging slur on CPM
  • City, Navajyoti rule
  • Stray violence in Kokrajhar
  • Award for Khasi film
  • Broken vows force villagers to build bridge
  • Tribute to Kohima's bravehearts
  • Football Lovers triumph
  • Ajmal is my friend but political enemy: Gogoi
  • Cadres in camps allowed to vote
  • Repoll in nine booths today
  • Battle of ballots likely for GSA
  • Bikers tour troubled spots
  • Youth shot dead by Tinsukia cop
  • Goalpara thrash