TT Epaper
The Telegraph
Graphiti
 
CIMA Gallary

Crimea integral part of Russia: Putin

Moscow, March 18 (Reuters): Russian President Vladimir Putin, defying Ukrainian protests and western sanctions, today signed a treaty making Crimea part Russia but said he did not plan to seize any other regions of Ukraine.

In Kiev today, Ukraine issued orders permitting its soldiers in Crimea to use weapons to protect their lives after a Ukrainian soldier was killed at a base that came under attack in Crimea’s main town Simferopol, acting President Oleksander Turchinov’s press service said. A second man, a captain, was injured.

In a fiercely patriotic address to a joint session of the Russian parliament in the Kremlin, punctuated by standing ovations, cheering and tears, Putin lambasted the West for what he called hypocrisy. Western nations had endorsed Kosovo's independence from Serbia but now denied Crimeans the same right, he said.

“You cannot call the same thing black today and white tomorrow,” he declared to stormy applause, saying western partners had “crossed the line” over Ukraine and behaved “irresponsibly”.

He said Ukraine’s new leaders, in power since the overthrow of pro-Moscow president Viktor Yanukovich last month, included “neo-Nazis, Russophobes and anti-Semites”.

Putin said Crimea’s disputed referendum vote on Sunday, held under Russian military occupation, had shown the overwhelming will of the people to be reunited with Russia after 60 years as part of the Ukrainian republic.

To the Russian national anthem, Putin and Crimean leaders signed a treaty on making Crimea part of Russia. During his address, Putin was interrupted by applause at least 30 times.

“In the hearts and minds of people, Crimea has always been and remains an inseparable part of Russia,” Putin said.

He thanked China for what he called its support, even though Beijing abstained on a UN resolution on Crimea that Moscow had to veto on its own, and said he was sure Germans would support the Russian people’s quest for reunification, just as Russia had supported German reunification in 1990.

And he sought to reassure Ukrainians that Russia did not seek any further division of their country. Fears have been expressed in Kiev that Russia might move on the Russian-speaking eastern parts of Ukraine.

“Don’t believe those who try to frighten you with Russia and who scream that other regions will follow after Crimea,” Putin said. “We do not want a partition of Ukraine. We do not need this.”

Setting out Moscow’s view of the events that led to the overthrow of Yanukovich in a popular uprising last month, Putin said the “so-called authorities” in Kiev had stolen power in a coup and opened the way for extremists who would stop at nothing.

Making clear Russia’s concern at the possibility of the US-led Nato military alliance expanding into Ukraine, he declared: “I do not want to be welcomed in Sevastopol (Crimean home of Russia’s Black Sea fleet) by Nato sailors.”

Moscow’s seizure of Crimea, denounced by the West as illegal and in breach of Ukraine's constitutions, has caused the most serious East-West crisis since the end of the Cold War.

Before Putin’s speech, Ukraine’s interim Prime Minister, Arseniy Yatseniuk, sought to reassure Moscow on two key areas of concern, saying in a televised address delivered in Russian that Kiev was not seeking to join Nato, the US-led military alliance, and would act to disarm Ukrainian nationalist militias.

Yesterday, the US and the EU imposed personal sanctions on a handful of officials from Russia and Ukraine accused of involvement in Moscow’s military seizure of the Black Sea peninsula, most of whose 2 million residents are ethnic Russians.

Russian politicians dismissed the sanctions as insignificant and a badge of honour.

 
 
" "