TT Epaper
The Telegraph
Graphiti
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary

Traffic cops eye 21st century gadgets

- Wheel lockers, oxygen masks & other hi-tech aids to give company to age-old helmet, baton

Jharkhand Police will equip East Singhbhum traffic police with “import-quality” gizmos this month to control vehicular movement and pull up errant drivers.

Goodies for traffic cops include breathalysers, wheel lockers, oxygen masks, megaphones, fluorescent jackets, glowing hand gloves, green and red stick lights, flexible spring posts and sliding barriers. For around 130-odd district traffic cops currently armed with nothing more than helmets and wooden batons, this is nothing less than a windfall.

Harried traffic policemen of Jamshedpur, Jharkhand’s second city, supervise five lakh vehicles everyday. There are five traffic police stations — at Sakchi, Bistupur, Golmuri, Mango and Jugsalai.

Jharkhand inspector-general (modernisation) Raj Kumar Mallick told The Telegraph they had procured modern gadgets worth around Rs 2 crore for traffic police across the state via a tender, with Ranchi and Jamshedpur being their priority.

“We will supply gadgets within a week of getting requisition from East Singhbhum district police. The move is aimed at equipping traffic police personnel to do a better job. The gadgets are now kept at police headquarters, Ranchi,” Mallick said.

East Singhbhum deputy superintendent of police (traffic) Rakesh Mohan Sinha said they had already sent a requisition.

“We have written to East Singhbhum senior superintendent of police Akhilesh Kumar Jha. He will be sending the requisition to IG (modernisation) tomorrow. We hope to get and use the gadgets from this month,” the traffic DSP said.

Elaborating on the numbers, he said: “The district traffic police has asked for 10 breathalysers, 50 wheel lockers, 600 oxygen masks, six mega phones, 500 white helmets, 400 fluorescent jackets, 200 glowing hand gloves, 75 stick lights each in green and red, 500 flexible spring posts and 200 sliding barriers.”

Breathalysers were necessary to give seriousness to the traffic police campaign against drunken driving on city roads, DSP (traffic) Sinha added.

For an affluent city where the number of vehicles competes with the number of parking violations, wheel lockers will also be useful.

“We face instances when influential people park four-wheelers at no-parking zones. If we paste prosecution slips, they get into arguments or don’t report on time to pay fines. These problems will be solved with wheel lockers. Violators would have no choice but to come to traffic cops and pay their fine immediately,” said the traffic DSP.

On the other gadgets, Sinha said: “Megaphones will help communicate with crowds, fluorescent jackets, glowing gloves and sticks will help people notice traffic cops even in darkness, flexible spring posts and sliding barriers will be used to divert routes during emergency.”

He added traffic police did a tough job under harsh conditions. “We are looking forward to oxygen masks that will ease the lives of traffic cops who otherwise inhale polluted emissions from vehicles,” he added.

Will the eye-popping gadgets be used for better traffic policing or will they rust?

Tell ttkhand@abpmail.com


 More stories in Jharkhand

  • Morning blaze at power plant, bank
  • Traffic cops eye 21st century gadgets
  • Bokaro boy found dead, friends suspect
  • Smart counters to speed up civic work
  • Luxury buses mooted
  • Elite scuba classes for ace diver Bari
  • MBA without job kills self
  • IPL net gain for budding bowlers
  • SKMU forms committee
  • CBI raids ex-JPSC officials' residences
  • Jewel thieves in net
  • Marandi backs MLA
  • Home in Dalma lands man in jail
  • Non-teaching staff spare capital
  • Women demand housing
  • Rash driving claims two
  • 3 cheers for cricket, it's family entertainment
  • Revival hopes for sport centre
  • Campaign for schooling tots
  • Final steps to the summit
  • Team in state next week
  • Students bear brunt of staff strike