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Science to tame criminals

Senior IPS officers from and outside the state shared their views on improving police investigation within the legal framework on Wednesday, while chief minister Nitish Kumar advised the personnel to go hammer and tongs on people involved in economic offences.

The senior officers, including those from central police organisations, are in Patna for the 43rd All-India Police Science Congress 2013 being organised in Patna since the city hosted the congress’ first edition in 1960. Bureau of Police Research and Development, New Delhi, is the organiser of the congress.

During the three-day brainstorming sessions, the officers would deliberate on the emerging trend of crime and the use of scientific tools in solving crimes.

After the inauguration of the congress by the chief minister, Jehanabad superintendent of police Harpreet Kaur, director of National Institute of Criminology and Forensic Science, New Delhi, Kamlendra Prasad and Sandeep Patil of cyber crime forensics (Mumbai) discussed ways to improve police investigation within the existing legal framework — the theme of Wednesday’s session.

Nitish, during the inauguration, urged the police officials to equip themselves with the latest gadgets and techniques to fight cyber and white collar crimes as these were posing stiff challenges to the security personnel. “The nature of crime has changed these days, hence, police personnel have to adapt themselves to this mould,” he said.

He said the state government was making efforts to provide necessary training, orientation of its personnel, while providing them with the latest arms and ammunition. “But you have to inculcate a sense of security among the people and win their confidence,” Nitish told the gathering.

Kumar Rajesh Chandra, additional director-general, special branch (Bihar), also explained how non-lethal weapons could be used effectively to defuse low-intensity conflicts. Ish Kumar, director (training), Bureau of Police Research and Development, Prateep V. Philip of Tamil Nadu and Sanjeev P. Sahni, director of Centre of Victimology and Psychological Studies, OP Jindal Global University, touched upon training and organisational interventions for sensitising the police in a bid to empower society.

Stressing on the state’s initiatives to strengthen its economic offences wing, Nitish asked the personnel to go hammer and tongs against public servants and middlemen involved in such offences. “The government wants to maintain zero tolerance so far the economic offences are concerned,” he said, urging the personnel to gather scientific evidences against offenders so that they cannot evade the law.