TT Epaper
The Telegraph
TT Photogallery
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary

A good outing, says Ed

Calcutta: Even after spinner Pervez Rasool wrecked havoc with a seven-wicket haul, Australia’s opener and top-scorer Ed Cowan is happy that his team got a taste of the turning wickets before the commence of the Test series.

“It was fantastic that the wicket did turn... Because, at the end of the day, we need to practice against the turning ball and we got that. It was almost as though the most dangerous shot was the forward defence. You had to find a way to get to the other end and get in a position to score runs,” said Cowan after the first day’s play.

“If you’re propped on the crease defending, then you’re playing into the spinners’ hands. I think the guys who scored runs found a way to actually hit the ball, rather than just defend. They were trying to put pressure on the bowlers. The guys would probably evaluate that their shots were on but the execution probably wasn’t as pure as they’d have liked.”

Talking about the sweep shots that cost Usman Khawaja his wicket, Cowan said, “Usman tried to sweep and unfortunately, it didn’t come off for him. I played a few. You can't sweep every ball, it becomes predictable.

“You got to know the line and length. I played a couple, Matthew Wade played the sweep pretty well. The top three played the sweep. It's not a question of sweeping every ball, because then you could get into as much trouble as not sweeping the ball, I think,” he explained.