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Importance of vernacular medium

Purabi Banerjee, principal, Netaji Vidyapith HS School

The significance of Netaji Vidyapith Railway HS School, which is almost six-and-a-half decades old, can be gauged from the numerous alumni members who have walked out of its hallowed gates and have carved out a niche for themselves.

Our school basically imparts teaching in both Bengali as well as in English, although we originally started as a Bengali-medium one. But over the years, with changing societal trends, a gradual decline in the number of students opting for Bengali medium necessitated the opening of an English medium section from 2005.

I still feel that Bengali-medium schools have an important role to play, as vernacular- medium schools are rooted in the rich culture of society. Bengali is one of the most beautiful languages in the world.

I am happy that one of the state’s rank holders in the HSLC 2009 exam under SEBA was from our Bengali-medium school. The school imparts quality education, including different types of co-curricular activities like music, games, sports, cubs, bulbuls, scouts, guides. Every year, a group of our students who pass from here, get admitted to the prestigious Cotton College.

I sincerely hope that students from the Bengali-medium school can do even better in the future if they take special interest in reading books, journals and newspapers along with inculcating an aptitude for conversing in English. I dream that just like Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s famous clarion call of Kadam Kadam Barhaye Ja, my students, too, would confidently march forward to success and glory.

Netaji Vidyapith HS School. Telegraph picture

Alumni reunite, recall golden days

Hundreds of alumni of Netaji Vidyapith from Assam as well as from other parts of the country assembled on the school campus at Maligaon in Guwahati on December 23 to participate in Pichutaan, a reunion of former students.

“It was a heavenly moment,” said Debajyoti Biswas, an assistant manager of Nabard, who is now based in Itanagar in Arunachal Pradesh.

Biswas, despite his hectic schedule, managed to spare a day and travelled miles to reach Guwahati to be a part of the grand alumni reunion of his alma mater.

The initiative for the reunion was taken by the alumni committee comprising the core group: president Partha P. Ghosh, secretary Champak Nag and cultural convener Suvendu Banerjee.

The extravaganza was attended by pupils from the batches of 1950 to 2011.

“I felt elated when I went to the grand alumni reunion of my alma mater after a long hiatus of 27 years. It was an evening of wonderful rendezvous with old friends, seniors and teachers. I felt as if I returned to my old school days. The happiest moment was when I and my son played on the same field where I once used to run and play,” Biswas said.

The first phase of the daylong event commenced with a programme titled Sankha Dhani.

After the lunch break, it was time for the much awaited antaranga alapan or interaction among old and new friends. One saw tears of joy welling up in the eyes of the people as they met their old friends. The alumni shared several memorable incidents, including those unintentional acts that had made their teachers angry.

R.S. Virdi, general manager of Northeast Frontier Railway, inaugurated the evening session by lighting the lamp. It was followed by cutting of a large cake by Virdi, who was the chief guest.

Painter Rabin Bar put up a marvellous show with speed painting, miscellaneous painting, sand painting and speed portrait.

A fabulous rendition of songs by Chandrima Bhattacharjee, a past pupil, brought the audience to the dance floor. Following this, the band Dohar performed.

Later, artist Rabin Bar drew a beautiful painting while Dohar sang, in a synchronised performance.

The day ended with a sumptuous dinner and a campfire.

The extravaganza was a great success with a gathering of old friends, who reminisced on the good old days and promised to stay in touch.

A staff reporter