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XLRI teaches power punches

- Day 2 of MAXI Fair organises hour-long karate training

Female students of XLRI on Sunday got some smart tips on self-defence.

The Jamshedpur-based business cradle during the second day of MAXI Fair on Sunday invited Shihan L. Nageshwar Rao, the chief instructor of All India Goju Ryu Karate Do Federation and his team, to teach women present at the fair the art of self-defence to tackle unpleasant situations.

The hour-long training workshop at the XLRI ground saw Rao and his team explaining in detail the basics of making the first strike to ward off your attacker and then following it up with others. Nearly 15 students from the school participated in the training and learnt the left-hand block technique, the art of the reverse punch and the response to be adopted against someone who forcibly tries to hold your hands.

“Karate teaches you basic steps to save yourself, which we call defence and then attack. I hope these basic demonstrations help in cases of emergency. I also strongly believe all the girls should learn some basic karate moves at least to save themselves,” Rao said while his demonstration.

The moves that the acclaimed karateka focussed on during his hour-long demonstration were self-defence techniques that enabled a victim to first free herself and then hit back at places like the stomach and knee-joints to stun her attacker. The idea being to flee to safety and not fight, the workshop also taught the girls ways to free themselves swiftly if she was held by her hair or collar.

“I am very happy with whatever I learnt today. The society we live in is not safe anymore. Hence, self-defence becomes important. Thanks to Sunday’s demonstration, I now know exactly what to do if I am attacked or groped,” said Soma Jana, a visitor who participated in the morning training.

MAXI Fair is XLRI’s annual two-day survey of corporate brands and consumer behaviour to determine what clicks and what does not. The fair uses various games to ferret out people’s insights into their decision making process.