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Stress blues across society, experts offer tips

- Insecurity among retired professionals, career-related anxiety among students on rise, say doctors

Stress management experts in the state capital have expressed concern over the rise in people — from retired bureaucrats to students — approaching them for help.

Milan Kumar Sinha (57), a Patna-based wellness consultant, said many people approach him with their stress-related problems. “Retired IAS officers, working professionals, lawyers, bankers and even students come to me for help. There is a substantial percentage of retired people among my patients. Around 200 people visit my clinic every month. Of them, around 50 or 60 have already retired from their jobs,” he added.

According to the expert, many retired persons feel stressed because of insecurity. Many miss their children, who live far away owing to their careers. There is a sense of fear among these people that their sons or daughters would not be with them when they would need them in times of sickness or other emergencies. Omprakash Dwivedi, a 68-year-old retired government employee said: “My son Priyam is working in the US. My son does not find enough time to talk with me owing to his work schedule. ”

Sinha said: “Five days ago, a retired IAS officer approached me for consultation. The person, who is in his mid 50s, said his children work as senior executives in IT firms outside the country. His children visit him once a year. The man was worried thinking what would happen in case he and his wife fell sick at the same time. This feeling of insecurity stressed him out. ”

Dr Binda Singh, a clinical psychologist in the state, said: “Several people suffer from stress without any valid reason. For example, there are women, who get tensed if their kids are outside the home. Even if the child goes to school or coaching classes, she will be anxious. These people suffer from anxiety neurosis, a type of a psychological problem.”

On stress among students, Sinha said: “Almost 80 per cent of the kids faced stress. A majority of parents put pressure on their wards to choose a career of their choice. Their dissatisfaction takes the shape of frustration and later, stress.”

Sinha said: “Another reason why some people feel stressed is they are not happy with their children’s career choices.” Twenty-two-year-old Gunjan (name changed) said: “My mother wants me to crack the entrance test of company secretaryship, while my father wants me to clear the bank probationary officer examination. I have to prepare for both. I was unable to take so much stress. My mother realised my condition and consulted a psychologist. After 3-4 counselling sessions, I feel much better now.”

On measures to tackle stress, Sinha said: “One should listen to music, watch comedy movies. Laughing is a very good way to beat stress. However, the most important thing is to spend time with people in whom they can confide. It is good to have a friend with whom one can share his/her problems. Communication is the key.”


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