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Officer was volatile at home: Children

Kabul, Dec. 26 (Reuters): The Afghan policewoman suspected of killing a US contractor at the police headquarters in Kabul suffered from mental illness and was driven to suicidal despair by poverty, her children told Reuters today.

The woman was identified by authorities as Narges Rezaeimomenabad, a 40-year-old grandmother and mother of three who moved here from Iran 10 years ago and married an Afghan man.

On Monday morning, she loaded a pistol in a bathroom at the police compound, hid it in her long scarf and shot an American police trainer, apparently becoming the first Afghan woman to carry out such an attack. Narges also tried to shoot police officials after killing the American. Luckily for them, her pistol jammed. Her husband is also under investigation.

Her son Sayed, 16, and daughter Fatima, 13, described how they tried to call their parents 100 times after news broke of the shooting, then waited in vain for them to come home.

They recalled Narges’s severe mood swings, and how at times she beat them and even pulled out a knife. But the children said she was consistent in bemoaning poverty.

“She was usually complaining about poverty. She was complaining to my father about our conditions. She was saying that my father was poor,” Sayid said in an interview in their damp, cold two-room cement house.

On the floor beside him were his mother’s prescriptions and a thick plastic bag filled with pills she tried to swallow to end the misery about a month ago. On another occasion, she cut her wrist with a razor, Sayed said.

“My father was usually calm and sometimes would say that she was guilty too because it wasn’t a forced marriage. They fell in love and got married.”

There was no sign in their neighbourhood of the billions of dollars of western aid that have poured into Afghanistan since the ouster of the Taliban in 2001, or of government investment.

The lane outside their home stank of raw sewage. Dirty, stagnant water filled holes in dirt roads nearby, where children in tattered clothes played and butchers stood by cow’s hooves in shops choked by dust.

At times, Narges would try to focus on building her children’s confidence, telling them to be guided by the Quran, to tackle life’s problems. Sayed and Fatima said she never spoke badly of the US presence in Afghanistan or of President Hamid Karzai’s government.

Neighbour Mohammad Ismail Kohistani was dumbfounded to hear on the radio that Afghan officials were combing Narges’s phone records to try to determine whether al Qaida or the Taliban could have brainwashed her into carrying out a mission. But he was acutely aware of her mental problems and often heard her scream at her husband.

 
 
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