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Sunday shock for Tendulkar fans

Sachin Tendulkar fans were crestfallen on Sunday after the master batsman announced his retirement from the one-day internationals (ODIs).

The cricketer’s legion of fans and admirers could hardly believe that Sachin would not be a part of Team India in the ODI series against the archrival Pakistan.

Sachin called it quits from the 50-over format after a career spanning over 23 years.

Amikar Dayal, a former Ranji player for Bihar, said: “The Indian team will always miss him in the ODI matches. Though he has retired from the shorter format of the game, he should not take any hasty decision and keep playing Test cricket. The longer version of the game requires him as this form of cricket requires experience and skill. It is different from ODIs and Twenty20 cricket.”

Echoing Dayal, Keshav Kumar a Jharkhand Ranji player but hailing from Patna said: “I had the opportunity of talking to Sachin a couple of times. I have seen him playing at Bandra Kurla Cricket Complex in Mumbai. Sachin is humble and a real gentleman.” The batting genius has scored 18,426 runs in 463 ODI appearances, a Herculean figure for most cricketers.

Mritunjay Tiwari, the president of Bihar Players’ Association, said: “The sudden retirement of Sachin from ODIs will be an advantage for Pakistan and England, who are scheduled to play in India. Though Sachin was not in good form of late, his mere presence was enough to create a psychological pressure on the opponents.”

It is ironical that Sachin chose to call it a day prior to a series versus Pakistan as he had made his ODI debut against the same nation.

From the winter of 1989, it has been a long journey for the modern-day Bradman. But like all good things, Sachin’s innings came to an end, rather, he chose to end it, leaving cricket buffs in disbelief and heartache. Ashish Sinha, a Jharkhand Ranji player and the president of Patna University Students’ Union, said: “We have grown up watching Sachin. The way he dominated the bowlers proves he had a sound technique and superb timing.”

If world-class bowlers on the field and the expectations of millions were not enough, Sachin had his adversaries in critics who would bay for his head after a failed series or a slump in form. But Sachin managed to hit them for a six for over two decades.

Sachin had cut down on playing ODI matches in the past couple of years. His last appearance in a 50-over match was in the Asia Cup in March.

Thank you “Master” for the delightful treat over two decades.