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March fast for solid waste plant

Come April 2013, waste will not be woe for capital Ranchi.

The 75-crore solid waste management plant coming up at Jhiri, near Ratu, under Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) is expected to become operational by March-end.

Officials of A2Z Waste Management Private Limited — the partner agency of Ranchi Municipal Corporation (RMC) that is constructing the plant — said 70 per cent work was over. This included basic infrastructure like the weight bridge and an office room, which are already functional.

“We are confident of completing construction by March. And by the end of that month, the plant will be commissioned,” said Arun Kumar Singh, general manager, A2Z.

According to plan, the solid waste management plant will also comprise a bio-fertiliser unit, a power unit and an interlocking brick-making facility. Nearly 95 per cent of the garbage collected and dumped at Jhiri, a village some 15km from the capital, would be used as raw material in all these units. The power unit will generate 14MW.

The RMC allotted 43 acres for the ambitious project, which kicked off in November last year. The deadline for the first unit — the bio-fertiliser facility — was June and the same for the rest was end of 2012.

But, progress of work remained slow because the agency had to level the hill on which the plant is being set up. Besides, heavy monsoon rain this year remained a deterrent and work could not be done in the desired pace.

Civic guardians have now asked the agency to speed up construction. A workforce of 100 has been engaged to expedite the project. “The agency has strictly been told to complete work by March so that the plant can start operations soon thereafter,” said Naresh Sinha, the public relations officer of RMC.

Solid waste has been a prolonged worry for the capital city. Although garbage was dumped at Jhiri, there were no provisions to recycle it so far. During monsoon, rainwater washed away mounds and sullied agricultural fields. Villagers had even complained of rashes while tilling their land this year, not to mention the unbearable stench.

A2Z officials are sanguine that such problems would end once the waste management plant saw the light of day.