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CIMA Gallary

Home truths about domestic violence

Cases of domestic violence more than doubled in the country over the past five years even though the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence (PWDV) Act was passed in 2005.

“We observe Womens’ Day every year but still violence against women increased because we don’t pay them the respect they deserve,” Speaker C.P. said at a day-long state-level consultative workshop on effective implementation of PWDV Act, 2005.

“There will be no dowry deaths if in-laws accept the bride as the daughter of the family and the latter treat her in-laws as her parents,” he added.

The workshop, conducted by Xavier Institute of Social Service (XISS), in association with OXFAM India, was held after a 16-day awareness campaign. Cases of domestic violence rose from 8.3 per cent in 2007 to 16.7 per cent in 2012, the organisers said, quoting Womens’ Helpline sources.

In order to spread awareness in society, they organised sensitisation programmes involving students of Delhi Public School, Ursuline Convent, Rayeen Urdu Girls’ High School and Kairali School, besides those from Ranchi University and XISS, said P.K. Praveen, regional manager, Oxfam India.

Women who were subjected to domestic violence are often thrown out of their homes. “They have no social security, can’t educate their children or even afford their medical expenses,” said Sunita of Jharkhand Positive Network.

“There is an act but that should be implemented effectively,” she noted, adding the government’s plans of rehabilitation should also be in place. The children who were witness to domestic violence involving their parents often became depressive and suicidal, opined Ranjana, member of a child protection committee.

“There is a need for addressing the issues to bring about effective change in the scenario,” opined Anant Kumar, assistant professor of XISS.

While everyone spoke for women, the XISS professor was the only one who asked that “men be included” in the discussion.