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Boy back with genetic mom

Ranchi, Dec. 10: Jharkhand High Court today ordered Ravish, alias Sunil Oraon, to be handed over to his DNA-proven biological mother, Ranchi homemaker Meera Devi.

The high drama started on November 8 when the court ordered DNA profiling as the only way to settle the curious case of the 11-year-old and his two contesting mothers — Meera Devi and Bolo Orain. It peaked on November 27 when genes, tested at Hotwar state forensic lab, were found backing the former’s claim.

Today, the division bench of Justice D.N. Patel and Justice Prashant Kumar, who heard Meera Devi’s writ petition claiming custody of lost son Ravish, ordered the boy’s release from the observation home so that he could be handed over to her.

The bench also stated it was assured that Meera Devi was the biological mother of Ravish.

Bolo Orain, the Ganeshpur village woman who had claimed to be the boy’s mother and had named him Sunil Oraon, did raise an objection. Bolo’s counsel informed the court that the DNA test report was “manipulated”.

But since he did not file an affidavit, the court did not entertain it.

Now, the challenge before Meera Devi would be to ensure her son Ravish’s psychological wellbeing.

The boy had lived a completely different identity for two years as the son of Bolo Orain, a tribal.

In November, the boy, speaking in fluent Sadri, had even said Bolo Orain was his mother. The DNA test proved him wrong.

The case, remarkable for its human drama as well as speedy justice, came before the high court when Meera Devi filed a petition to claim Ravish, whom she said went missing in 2009.

She had also lodged an FIR with Sukhdevnagar police station.

Earlier this year, when she learnt from Chanho villagers that the boy had been seen in Ganeshpur, in the same block, she rushed there.

A flummoxed Meera Devi saw that a tribal woman (Bolo Orain) called him Sunil, her son, and refused to give up the boy. That’s when Meera Devi moved court.


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