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MGM wakes up to medicine crisis

An acute shortage of medicines at MGM Medical College and Hospital has prompted the authorities to decide on floating tender on Saturday for procuring fresh stock.

A state government committee that monitors hospital purchases, headed by MGM superintendent S.S. Prasad, on Wednesday inspected data on price lists and drug suppliers before determining to start the tender process for medicines worth Rs 1.25 crore.

“We have initiated the tender process and a fresh stock of medicines will reach us by the month end,” Prasad told The Telegraph.

The tender for medicines is required as the stock has been exhausted leading to a crisis that has hit patients, mostly belonging to the lower strata.

The hospital superintendent pointed out that MGM was recently allotted Rs 125 crore by the state health department.

“The fact that there was a shortage came to the fore after the staff responsible for keeping stock sent indents for medicines. It was after receiving the official order for various medicines, including live-saving drugs, antibiotics and saline, that I realised there is a medicine crisis,” said Prasad.

Due to the shortage, the hospital staffers are asking the patients to procure medicines from local stores.

Many poor patients are compelled to go without medicines for want of money, as they bank on the hospital to receive it for free.

On Wednesday morning, a 10-year-old boy arrived at the emergency ward complaining of dog bite. As there was no anti-rabies injection, the doctors on duty referred the boy to a primary health centre in Mango.

Madan Purty, a resident of Parsudih, said, “We were under the impression that the hospital has all facilities. But we have to travel to Mango, about 4km further, for an injection.”

Shishir Tuddu, who had come from Rairangpur block of Mayurbhanj district in Odisha for the treatment of his daughter, left in a huff on learning that the hospital lacked enough medicines.

For over 400 patients currently undergoing treatment at the hospital without medicines, a team of efficient doctors and surgeons is a much-needed silver lining.