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Aliah course for civil services

Youths from the minority community will have a better chance of cracking the state civil service exams with Aliah University training them, in collaboration with the West Bengal Minorities Development and Finance Corporation.

Thirty-one candidates, seven of them girls, have been selected for the free training after they cleared an entrance examination conducted by the university last month.

All expenses for study material, food and accommodation during the eight-month course will be borne by the minorities affairs and madarsa education department. The students will be accommodated on a campus at Salt Lake for the duration of the course.

Training for civil service exams at a private institute in the city costs in the range of Rs 30,000 to Rs 50,000, excluding food and accommodation expenses.

“Few youths from the community opt for a career in administration because they either do not have access to information or lack the resources,” said M. Anasar Alam, officer on special duty, Aliah University. “We have started the course to train youths who have the zeal for a career in administration. They will not be charged anything. All we want from them is dedication.”

The university is intent on giving candidates the best. “Serving WBCS and IAS officers will be a part of the faculty. We are also engaging professional teachers from various institutions in the city,” said Jawaid Akhtar, the managing director of West Bengal Minorities Development and Finance Corporation.

The Sachar Committee report, 2006, had revealed that Muslim representation in government jobs in Bengal was a meagre 3 per cent. The then Left Front government had drawn severe criticism from Mamata Banerjee over the findings.

Alam said Aliah University has trained nearly 7,100 people in the last four years and half of them have got jobs.