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Mimoh and his big boss

While dad Mithun Chakraborty munched on Galouti Kebab and Wasabi Onions, Mimoh polished off two plates of Chicken Tikka, chatting with t2 about his first Bengali film Rocky and more at Veda on Park Street on Wednesday evening. Between bites...

Mithun is in Calcutta since you started shooting for Rocky. Is he taking a special interest because it’s your first Bengali film?

Hell! Yeah absolutely. My diction is not right and he is helping me with that. Dad and I are doing workshops together every day. It’s a routine... I wake up, sit for my make-up, go to the sets, come back, take a swim, sit with him and do a workshop because even he knows the importance of Rocky (directed by Sujit Mondal and produced by Shree Venkatesh Films).

Why is Rocky so important?

Because of my father’s legacy. Mithun Chakraborty is Mahaguru in Bengal. My father’s career won’t be affected if my film bombs but as a father, he would be disappointed. I am not saying that Rocky would be a sure-shot hit but I want to see the first cut of Rocky and say, ‘I am proud of it!’ I can’t screw it up... because I had done it once with Jimmy (his debut film in 2008).

I know who I am. I know the hopes and faith, dreams and happiness associated with this project. This is the best film that a newcomer can get. It’s got everything... action, dance, romance. I play a simple guy whose life changes when he falls in love with a girl (Puja). If it were my first Hindi film instead of Jimmy, it would have been an awesome break! Luckily, I got it in Bengali where my dad’s hold is 10 times more than in any other part of the country. Expectations are going to be sky-high because I’m Mithun’s son. Curse, curse, curse, and again curse, curse, curse! It’s a curse. I do one thing wrong and they pick on me, I do nine things right and they won’t notice. They are waiting for me to screw up. But then you know, nobody gave my father a big break. He came up the hard way. I want to be that guy.

Do you keep track of what’s happening in Tollywood?

Of course, I need to know what my competitors are doing. I am not here to bond with the other actors or heroines. I am here to work. After the debacle of Jimmy, I sat at home without work for three years while the other newcomers went ahead. I am still in the race, running behind.

How helpful are Mithun’s tips, considering that he belonged to a different time altogether?

See, dad’s not asking me to do it his way. He tells me to do it the right way. Because of the 35-plus years of experience, I don’t think I have the balls to tell him, ‘Dad, that’s not right!’ He will say, pack your bags and go home! I don’t think I ever had the balls to argue with him. And he’s not given me the opportunity too because he’s always been right. Forget films... he has slogged his ass off and suffered so that we could be happy. Not taking advice from a man like him is an insult to him.

Are you a very obedient son?

There are times when I know I just have to keep quiet because he is the boss. I don’t just consider him my father. I consider him the boss of the family. In fact, we all call him big boss! But I am not a man yet. The day I become a man, he will listen to me. I am just 28. I have just started handling the hotel business in Ooty.

How do you all chill out at home?

We have a rule that whenever all the six members (Mithun, wife Yogeeta and kids Mimoh, Rimoh, Namashi and Dishani) are home, we would have lunch and dinner together. We love being at home. We are not attention-seeking people.

So you look up to Mithun as your father or as a superstar?

I look up to him as the man in his pyjamas! At home he is a cook, a farmer, a man who loves his family to death. He is a man who worships his work. He is a man of ideals, a friend, brother, mentor. Yes, there is a generation gap. For them sex meant behind the doors, for us sex is open. That’s the only difference.