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CIMA Gallary

The bride

“I am personally very fond of shabeki (traditional) jewellery. All my jewellery has a touch of the traditional.... I can’t wear them all the time since the pieces are so heavy. This look represents exactly that... traditional Bengali!” — Arpita

Look 1 --- Modern

The sari: A beige-and-red taant with gold stripes on the border, from CIMA.

The jewels: Jorowa Projapoti Haar and tribal art-inspired pendants strung on a red cord for the neck. Gold bangles and Shaakha with taar and chhilekata work on the wrists. Katai-work Pasha on the ears and a gold brooch to pin the sari pleats. “The bangles have what we call the Sarada-paak design. It dates back to the time of Ma Sarada!” said Anargha Chowdhury, director of Anjali Jewellers.

The makeover: Make-up pro Aniruddha Chakladar gave Arpita a light base and soft kohl eyes, smokey on the outer corner. She wore her hair loose — out-turned and blow-dried.

Look 2 -- Traditional

The sari: A flaming red tangail with zari work on the body and pallu, from CIMA.

The jewels: Traditional gold ornaments worn in Bengali zamindar families — Teen Nori Guinea Mala, Jorowa choker, Chandtara Naksha Tikli, Jorowa Kaan, Jorowa Chur and Noth, plus Mathar Bagan and Mathar Kaanta. “All these items are hand-crafted. If you look closely, you’ll see the Noth has a lovely plait-and-cycle chain detailing,” Anargha pointed out.

The makeover: Complementing the jewellery and drape were kohl-laden smokey eyes. “I have given her a touch of maroon and deepened the gold shade to glam up her eyes,” said Aniruddha. Noor Alam did Arpita’s hair in a shabeki-style low bun.

The Anjali collection will be on display at CIMA Gallery (second floor, Sunny Towers, 43 Ashutosh Chowdhury Avenue) till October 3, 11am to 8pm