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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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Calcutta Weather
WeatherTemperature
Min : 27.30°C (+1)
Max : 34.00°C (+1)
Rainfall : 1.60 mm
Relative Humidity:
Max : 94.00% Min : 67.00%
Sunrise : 5:26 AM
Sunset : 5:34 PM
Today
Partly cloudy sky. Maximum temperature likely to be around 33°C.
 
CIMA Gallary

Monsoon in Sept T20 slog

Monsoon is hitting its way out of trouble in the slog overs after struggling through most of its innings, bringing more rain to Calcutta in the first three weeks of September than it usually does in the entire month.

Given the usual late flourish in south Bengal in the last week of September, weather scientists predict a few more showers over the next nine days to reduce the season’s rain deficit.

The average rain aggregate for September is 312.6mm, based on the monthly readings starting 1971. This year, the city has already received 341.2mm of rain with nine days still to go.

“Throughout June and July, the weather was muggy with little rain. There would be a cloud build-up and thunder but hardly any rain. I am glad September has brought some rain to remind us that monsoon still exists!” said Antara Manna, a college student from Shyambazar.

The season had started on a bleak note in June, with the monsoon arriving late and failing to pick up pace. July and early August weren’t any different.

The resurgence began post-Independence Day T20 style, as if in preparation for the World Cup of slam-bang that has just begun in Sri Lanka.

The total rain deficit that stood at over 40 per cent on August 15 with the business end of monsoon gone — July is usually the wettest month of the year — is now 14 per cent for Calcutta after the strong rearguard action.

The current deficit for the rest of south Bengal is 13 per cent.

“There was a deficit of 38 per cent in rainfall in both June and July for Calcutta and the situation worsened in the first fortnight of August. There has, however, been a turnaround since,” said Gokul Chandra Debnath, director of the Alipore Meteorological Centre.

August had seen 96.7mm of rainfall in the first 15 days and 173.5mm in the next two weeks.

Monsoon’s comeback continued in September with the daily rainfall going past the 85mm mark on two occasions, on September 5 and 15.

Weather scientists say more is in store, though there are no immediate signs of a downpour yet.

“It’s a trend in Calcutta for rain to increase in the last 10 days of September. This happens because of the formation of wind systems like depressions and cyclonic circulations. No such formation is visible at the moment but we expect to see some soon,” said an official at the India Meteorological Department in Delhi.