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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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Calcutta Weather
WeatherTemperature
Min : 25.40°C (-1)
Max : 31.10°C (-1)
Rainfall : 16.50 mm
Relative Humidity:
Max : 97.00% Min : 80.00%
Sunrise : 5:25 AM
Sunset : 5:39 PM
Today
One or two spells of rain or thundershowers.
 
CIMA Gallary

Downpour here, dry there

If the weather office is to be believed, there was little rain in the city on Sunday. Its Alipore office recorded only 16.5mm in 24 hours and Dum Dum even less: 10mm.

So what were you wading through when crossing large parts of central Calcutta?

Luckily, the CMC’s Hrishikesh Park pumping station off College Street has assured us that it was indeed rainwater — for, 80mm rain (make that downpour) was recorded there in 90 minutes.

“Other parts of north and central Calcutta also received heavy rainfall. The Palmer Bazar station near Sealdah recorded 55mm and Maniktala 35mm. The maximum rainfall was localised around central Calcutta bounded by APC Road and Strand Road,” said Rajib Deb, mayoral council member in charge of drainage and sewerage.

That was enough to flood Central Avenue, Bidhan Sarani and Amherst Street, at places to waist-deep effect.

The ground reality was, however, very different further north near Dum Dum where it rained only 10mm and down south, where the Alipore Met office recorded 16.5mm of rain.

As a result, areas like Rashbehari Avenue, Ballygunge, New Alipore and Behala that resembled a river on Saturday were a study in contrast on Sunday. “It did rain in these parts but the intensity was nowhere close to Saturday’s downpour,” said a CMC official.

On Saturday, the Alipore weather office recorded 85.8mm of rain while the Dum Dum office showed 4.3mm, which was mirrored by the waterlogging map.

The weatherman said that the territorial rain divide — something that has happened repeatedly this season — was caused by convective clouds and thunderstorm activity, which lead to “localised rainfall” or rain concentrated around a smaller area than normal monsoon rainfall.

“Such clouds are formed when there is a strong atmospheric system present — in this case the monsoon trough which gathered strength from a cyclonic circulation over Jharkhand,” said a senior official of the India Meteorological Department, Calcutta.

The forecast, however, is for rainfall in the city to lessen in the next 24 hours with the weather systems weakening.