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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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End of a chapter

Among Philip Crosland’s few possessions when he died last Saturday, aged 94, was a sheet of paper on which was typed: “To Mr P.W.J. Crosland/ The cold and silent lake water/ under the bloomed peach tree/ is so deep,/ The depth is unmeasurable/ when a dear friend bids farewell.” The date is May 6, 1967, the day he retired from the Statesman after nearly 30 years. ...   | Read..
 
Letters to the Editor
Spill the beans
Sir — Politicians often blame suicides of farmers on the faulty policies pursued by opponents. This ...  | Read.. 
 
Sticky wicket
Sir — Greg Chappell is an expert in cracking jokes. His statement that Rahul Dravid would have been ...  | Read.. 
 
Raging bullies
Sir — I faced a harrowing incident recently which goes to show the difficulties that ordinary peopl ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL

MODERN THINGS

“They've just been waiting in a mountain/ For the right moment/ Listening to the irritating noises/ Of dinosaurs and pe...   | Read..
 
OPED
Do not go looking for logic
Summer is over, and although monsoon is here only in name, galleries have gradually started opening up. Ganges Art Gallery had braved the heat and organized shows throughout, ...  | Read.. 
 
Searing and stiff
Tagore’s influence on others inspires two Bengali productions. Dr Janusz Korczak of the Warsaw orphanage found in The Post Office a sublime way to prepare his wards for...  | Read.. 
 
A journey of unequal pleasures
The Indian Council for Cultural Relations organized a group exhibition by its scholars at the Jamini Roy Gallery of the Rabindranath Tagore Centre. The exhibition, titled O...  | Read.. 
 
THIS ABOVE ALL
Live and let live
I never intentionally murdered a snake, but killed a few by mistake by running them over. One was a large king cobra in the S...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by sceptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were.— JOHN KEATS