TT Epaper
The Telegraph
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary

Lens on the Great Game

It would perhaps not be an exaggeration to say that visual artists do not usually write about their oeuvre — and when they do, the reader gets an amazing glimpse into the workings of creative minds. Although apparently not a pleasant man, the photographer, Samuel Bourne, had a facile pen that brough...   | Read..
 
Letters to the Editor
The poor men in black
Sir — The Indian Railways has prescribed the uniform of black coats and blazers for its employees a ...  | Read.. 
 
False values
Sir — India claims to be on the verge of becoming a global superpower. Yet atrocities against women ...  | Read.. 
 
Pay to pray
Sir — On June 28, I drove to the Kali temple with my wife and children. There were no No-Entry boar ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL

DREAM HELD IN THE HAND

If god did indeed make the world, Steve Jobs transformed it. When Alexander Bell invented the telephone, and Alan Turing’s ...   | Read..
 
DIARY
 
bullet Pure magic
bullet Fond memories
bullet Number game
bullet Old habit
bullet Perfect hosts
bullet Witty star
SCRIPSI
Anybody can look at a pretty girl and see a pretty girl. An artist can look at a pretty girl and see the old woman she will become. A better artist can look at an old woman and see the pretty girl that she used to be. But a great artist — a master — and that is what Auguste Rodin was — can look at an old woman, portray her exactly as she is... and force the viewer to see the pretty girl she used to be... and more than that, he can make anyone with the sensitivity of an armadillo, or even you, see that this lovely young girl is still alive, not old and ugly at all, but simply prisoned inside her ruined body. He can make you feel the quiet, endless tragedy that there was never a girl born who ever grew older than eighteen in her heart... no matter what the merciless hours have done to her. — ROBERT A. HEINLEIN