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IIM dream comes true for 166

- Aspirants overlook lack of permanent campus to make a beeline for B-school

While the rest of the capital worries about a whimsical monsoon, it is raining students at IIM-Ranchi.

Land acquisition bottlenecks for its campus remain unresolved, but where Mission Admission is concerned, IIM-Ranchi has landed on firm ground. It admitted 166 students this year across its PGDM (postgraduate diploma in management), PGDHRM (postgraduate diploma in human resource management) and PhD (fellow) programmes. The PGDHRM and PhD programmes started from 2012.

“The new students had their orientation programme on June 24. They have started classes from June 25. They are a bright bunch,” IIM-Ranchi’s administrative officer G. Jilani said.

In 2010, only 44 were admitted in the basic PGDM course, which rose to 63 in 2011.

B-school authorities initially planned to induct 130 students — 90 in PGDM, 30 in PGDHRM and 10 as fellows. They thought any more would be unwieldy as the cradle is split in three locations — classes at Suchana Bhavan, the building owned by the information and public relations department, and hostels at the National Games Housing Complex and Sri Krishna Institute of Public Administration (SKIPA) for boys and girls.

But the swelling number of students and courses gives a ringing endorsement for the IIM’s faculty, course content and placement network despite a permanent campus staying a dream. The proposed one at Nagri is hanging fire due to the land deadlock.

“The response has been awesome. Of about 200 registrations, we are finally admitting 166 students, 117 for PGDM, 44 for PGDHRM and five for the four-year fellowship programmes,” IIM-Ranchi director M.J. Xavier told The Telegraph over phone from Lucknow, where he is attending a meet hosted by the Union ministry of human resource development.

On the students, the most sought-after two-year PGDM course is undoubtedly tech-heavy, reaffirming the stereotype that engineers graduate to be managers. Of the 117, 108 have engineering or tech backgrounds, three have economics/commerce degrees, two have studied management, another two have studied pharmacology and only one is from humanities.

Most have worked before. Only 32 are fresh out of colleges or institutes. Others have work experience on their CVs ranging from a brief one month to a sizeable six years.

Unlike in 2010, which had a lone female student, and 2011, which did not have any, 2012 has 44 girls. In PGDM, there are 96 male and 21 female students. In PGDHRM, 23 out of the 44 are girls.

“No complaints this year,” laughed Xavier. “But we’d like a better response for the fellowship programmes as there were 10 seats on offer but we could select only five students. It seems interest in research is drying up, but we do stress on top-notch minds for this challenge across different fields of management.”

Does IIM have the capital’s intellectual pride of place?

Tell ttkhand@abpmail.com