TT Epaper
The Telegraph
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary
Cactus on screen, 10 years after Nil Nirjane

A decade after they scored a first with a Bangla band music video being featured in a Bengali film (Nil Nirjane), Cactus was back on the floors on Saturday afternoon to shoot for documentary filmmaker Rana Basu’s directorial debut Namte Namte.

Cactus shoots a song for Namte Namte on Saturday. Picture by Anindya Shankar Ray

In bright tees, dark shades and colourful skullcap, the six band members strummed and sang on a makeshift stage at NT1 Studio that looked like a warehouse with tyres and ropes mounted on ladders.

With a grungy Bong rock number swelling in the background, frontmen Sidhu and Pota took centre stage in a haze of smoke, singing, jiving and making it look like a live gig.

“It’s a song about time lapse. The film moves forward by three months during the course of this song and we’ve tried to capture the progress of time through our signature grooves,” said Sidhu, who is making his debut as a music director with Namte Namte.

“I’ve composed five songs. Rupankar has sung a lullaby, Shreya Ghoshal has done a teenage romantic song, Mir and Bandage have recorded a full-on keora number and Anupam Roy has joined me in singing the title track!” said Sidhu.

Cactus’s music video for Subrata Sen’s Nil Nirjane “turned out to be a big hit and we still get requests for it during our live shows,” added Sidhu. “I’m sure the audience will have great expectations from us, so we’re a bit nervous too. The biggest challenge was to maintain our sound within the texture of the film and not lose the balance.”

Mohua Das