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Young and old spoilt for choice at amusement fair
- Adventure rides, lip-smacking snacks, garments, books, handicraft and toys draw visitors in hordes

Fun World, an amusement fair that started on the Patliputra grounds from June 4, has proved to be a runaway hit among the residents of the state capital, young and old.

Open between 4pm and 10pm, a ticket worth Rs 10 guarantees a galaxy of fun activities. Tastefully decorated with red, blue yellow and green fairy lights, the fair has been attracting people in hordes, especially children, whose summer school break could not have come at a better time.

Various rides, including the Giant Wheel, the Break Dance and the Frisbee among others, are leaving people yearning for more.

The noticeable factor is that the GenY, which is addicted to modern-day amusement like computer and video games, is also making a beeline for the fair.

“Fairs like this have been associated with our lives since childhood. Being an adventure-loving person, the Giant Wheel and the boatride are my favourites,” said Ashwini, a resident of Sheopuri.

Many visitors seem to be completely smitten by several amusement experiences in Fun World, which the capital is seeing for the first time. “Most fairs in Patna have Giant Wheel and merry-go-around as the main rides, but at Fun World, I can experience the real fun. I have never seen Scary House or the Dragon Ride in any previous Patna fair,” said Shobhit, a resident of Anandpuri, a second- time visitor.

While most visitors had good things to say about the fair, there were a few who were not amazed. “Fun World has nothing special about it, which can bring me back here again. I have visited fairs in Delhi and Bangalore and those were completely unique and had artistic displays and kiosks for branded products as well,” said Subhadeep Saha, a BTech student from Delhi.

Fun World is also attracting a decent number of shopaholics. Visitors roam and check out the various kiosks that are offering garments, accessories, handicraft, furniture, toys, kitchen appliances, eatables and books among other items.

“The variety of products available at these stalls seem to be priced reasonably to me. Thus, I ended up buying so many things for my household. It is advantageous for me because of the proximity of the fair to my neighbourhood. I can make short visits,” said Seema Singh, a resident of Patliputra.

The vendors or kiosk owners are also doing brisk business. “The sales at my shop have been well from the first day itself. Though customers bargain, they end up buying stuff from my kiosk,” said Firoz Hasmi, a bagseller at the fair.

Fun World manager M.K. Singh told The Telegraph: “It took us around a month to prepare the set-up for the entire fair to make it perfect. Taking permission from the government, taking the ground on rent from Patliputra Co-operative Society, setting up the different rides and kiosks and co-ordinating with the local police for safety arrangements took a lot time.”

He added: “The idea of Fun World is mooted by Tamanna Hussain, the fair organiser. We plan to organise Fun World in every district or town in Bihar and Madhya Pradesh. After Patna, our next destination would be Muzzaffarpur_. Fun World is not just a fair but it is also an attempt to create employment opportunities for local people as the funds raised through the fair is also used for paying salaries to the workers, who are mostly local residents.”

Fun World would wind up in the state capital on July 18.