TT Epaper
The Telegraph
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary

Hill students face NBU axe

Darjeeling, Nov. 30: More than 200 students of Darjeeling Government College are in a spot after it came to light that four new subjects they enrolled in this academic session were not approved by the university.

Two-hundred students of the general pass course had taken up sociology and anthropology and six and eight students had been admitted to honours courses in computer science and biotechnology respectively.

North Bengal University has already rejected the registration of the 14 honours students. The general course students now fear that they might suffer the same fate.

All the four subjects were introduced in Darjeeling Government College in October this year by former principal Dipak Ray without waiting for the mandatory clearance of the university to which the college is affiliated.

The four departments were being run by part-time teachers in the absence of permission from the government and sanctioned posts.

“The principal has to write to the state higher education department and the university to which it is affiliated to start any subject in a college. The university will then send an inspection team. After a report is submitted, it has to be accepted by the university’s undergraduate council and the executive council. If the university gives the nod, the principal has to write to the government,” said current principal Lalita Ahmed Rai who has taken charge on November 3.

Ray had informed the university about the plan to introduce four new subjects.

“An inspection team had been sent but the formalities were not completed,” said Rai.

The new principal said the university would be requested to change the subjects of the students.

Sources said while students of sociology and anthropology were willing to shift if they were allowed, those in computer science and biotechnology said they had taken admission in this college only because it offered such courses.

Vice-chancellor Arunava Basumajumdar could not be reached for comments as repeated calls to his cellphone went unanswered.