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The city’s favourite authors

chetan bhagat

The investment banker gatecrashed the book biz box-office in 2004 with Five Point Someone. A youthful plot set in IIT Delhi, the right lingo and a Rs 95 price tag meant that young India lapped it up. The IIM grad followed it up with One Night @ The Call Center, The 3 Mistakes of My Life and 2 States. In 2010, Time magazine named him one of the world’s 100 most influential people.

Last word: He sells everywhere, from bookstores to Big Bazaar

 

 

 

Dan Brown

He was a songwriter who turned novelist after reading Sidney Sheldon in 1993. Ten years on, Dan Brown’s fourth book, The Da Vinci Code, topped the New York Times bestseller in Week One. As symbologist Robert Langdon raced against time to break an ancient code, the whole world turned pages fervently, taking the book’s sales to 81 million in six years.

Last word: Brown is known to write in his loft and hang himself upside down to beat writer’s block

Stieg Larsson

Swedish journalist Stieg Larsson’s posthumously published Millennium trilogy has sold over 27 million copies since The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo hit the sweet spot in 2005. The hero? Lisbeth Salander, a 25-year-old you don’t want to mess with. Her second lead? Investigative reporter Mikael Blomkvist. Larsson made no attempt to get the books published until shortly before his death, due to heart attack, in 2004. He was aged 50. The plot thickens, with every page.

Last word: If only they made more girls like Lisbeth and guys like Blomkvist!

 

 

Amitav Ghosh

He spends at least a few weeks every year in Jodhpur Park, so we can easily claim this New Yorker as our own. The Shadow Lines (1988) won him the Sahitya Akademi Award and Ananda Puraskar. Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.

Last word:The second book in the Ibis trilogy — River of Smoke — is scheduled to come out
later this year

Stephenie Meyer

A homemaker and mother of three, Stephenie Meyer became an overnight star with the vampire love story Twilight in 2005. After the fourth book, Breaking Dawn, in 2008, Meyer found herself perched on the NYT bestseller list in the Children’s Series category for 235 weeks.

Last word: Meyer claims the plot for Twilight came to her in a dream. And you thought sleeping never made anyone rich or famous!


THE IMMORTALS OF MELUHA
amish

A tale steeped in Indian history and mythology, this is the first book in the Shiva trilogy. Written by Amish (Tripathi), a finance professional and an IIM Calcutta alumnus, the 2010 book is set in 1900 BC in the land of Meluha, an empire created by Lord Rama.

Likely Bolly adaptation: Hey Ram, not starring Arun Govil

SUPERPOWER?
raghav bahl

The Network 18 MD discusses one of the biggest tussles in Asia in Superpower? The Amazing Race Between China’s Hare and India’s Tortoise. Giving a peek into the inner workings of the India-China battle for superpower status, Bahl debates whether China will scale the economic peak faster or will something more intangible than economic growth work in India’s favour.

Likely sequel: Powercut? The Amazing Race Between Bihar’s Hare and Bengal’s Tortoise

MAY I HEBB YOUR ATTENTION PLISS!
arnab ray

ogger Arnab Ray, aka Greatbong, takes a sarcastic, almost caustic, look at all that’s changed since the good ol’ Nineties, from opulent weddings, B-grade Bollywood movies to pompous NRIs. Witty in parts, slapstick in others, the Jadavpur University engineer manages to elicit quite a few laughs, sometimes despite yourself.

Likely Tollywood adaptation: Dada, Ektu Shunben?


 

STAY HUNGRY STAY FOOLISH
rashmi bansal

If you want to be your own boss, this book is for you. If you are a disillusioned entrepreneur on the verge of giving up, this book is for you. Mumbai-based Rashmi Bansal tells the story of 25 graduates of “India’s Harvard”, IIM Ahmedabad, who shunned plum jobs and turned entrepreneurs.

 

CONNECT THE DOTS
rashmi bansal

Rashmi Bansal returns with the story of 20 individuals who never went to B-school but set up their own ventures. The mantra: you don’t need a fancy degree or a rich daddy to dream big and make it happen.

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