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Bronze & breezy
Kiran Uttam Ghosh takes the bow at WIFW; (below) a glimpse from her ramp show. Pictures by Jagan Negi

As Delhi’s Wills Lifestyle India Fashion Week settled down, with Day 4 becoming Day 3 in effect (March 24, the first day, had to be called off due to an objection from the fire department and Delhi Police), it was business as usual at Okhla’s NSIC Complex, the new WIFW venue.

Kiran Uttam Ghosh, who is celebrating 15 years of her label, showed her latest line titled Chiconomics on Saturday afternoon. She began her runway story exactly where she had left off last fall at Kolkata Fashion Week, literally picking up pieces (in this case, both the silhouettes and the bamboo elements from her CIMA installation) to head fashion forward.

All the Kiran Uttam Ghosh moments were there in the 30-odd looks sent out on the catwalk — layers, luxe embellishments and easiness that is almost edgy. The showing began with a line in bronzy-gold and this look dominated the show till a tiny trickle of colour emerged closer to the end.

The silhouettes were very relaxed, lots of separates put together to satisfy the criteria of both chic and economy. There was something very desi about the mood board: Kiran’s flapper girl who went to the Orient this spring-summer looked as though she had decided to stick around in India for a while! The criss-cross drapes resembled a sari pallu, and that too when you least expected it, accompanying palazzo pants and tunic. There were two saris as well, both worn by Bhavna. A lehnga was given a sporty treatment, with a border that reminded you of a ribbed sweater, extra-long grungy tee-like sequin-splattered blouses, another tiered lehnga-like dress worn with a sports bra-like choli, Patiala salwar-like pants, skirts that looked like lungis with side slits… And the way the models walked, bunching up their dresses was exactly how a sari-clad girl would take the stairs. So despite all the flashes of couture, the collection was dominated by the casual: the rolled-up sleeves, high necks, cool cowls, dungaree-inspired pinafores sweeping the floors, a one-off kite dress.

Sequins apart, the chosen details were metallic foiling, some crystal collars and a pared-down version of her temple embroidery from last winter.

The models shone with iridescent mouths and slightly smoky eyes, gelled back hair knotted atop their heads.

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