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Attack kills Imphal doc

Imphal, Feb. 27: An army doctor from Manipur’s Bishnupur district was among the six Indians killed in the Taliban-co-ordinated suicide attacks on two Kabul hotels yesterday.

For the family of the slain doctor, Major Laishram Jyotin Singh, 38, the shock has been compounded by the fact that all these days they were under the impression that he was in Congo on a US mission.

The relatives, who were informed of the tragedy last night by an army officer from Delhi, are still trying to come to terms with the news that the family’s eldest son has been killed in Afghanistan.

“Is the report of my son’s death in Kabul true? Please tell us if you know the truth. I don’t believe that my son was killed in Kabul because he is in Congo,” the doctor’s mother, Ibeyaima Devi, wailed inconsolably at their home in Nambol Awang Leikai village.

Singh, who had joined the Army Medical Corps in February 2003, was in Kabul to train local doctors at the Indira Gandhi Hospital.

“We do not believe my brother is dead because he is away in Congo. He never told us he was in Kabul. He called me on Thursday and told me to deposit money in the bank for repayment of a loan taken by him for buying a plot of land in Guwahati,” his elder sister Ragini Devi said.

Singh’s training for a mission in Congo concluded this month. When he visited home last November, he had told his family that he was headed for the African country.

Singh passed his MBBS from the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences in Imphal in 1996. “Though he was in the army, he did not fight wars. He went there to save people’s lives. Why did they (the Taliban) kill a man who saved lives?” Ibeyaima Devi asked.

Singh’s family members blamed security lapses for his death. They also turned their ire against the attackers.

“Let all terrorists be cursed and wiped out from the earth,” Singh’s father, Markando Singh, a retired deputy director of the state agriculture department, said.

The doctor’s body is likely to be brought here tomorrow.

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