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Tunes with a rare freshness

Angaraag Mahanta is one of the few singers to have earned mass acceptance after Zubeen Garg in Assam.

After his dream debut with the album Jonaaki Raati, he has carved a niche for himself among the music lovers in the state. His second album, Sinaaki Osinaaki, released recently, contains all the signs of freshness in his approach to the rendition of modern songs.

The very first number of the album, Puwaar Rodaaliye Aahi Aakaashok Koi Jaay..., penned by the singer himself, is an enchanting off-beat piece with sound base guitar accompanied by drums. The lyrics are associated with the celebration of bright sunshine and the singer, with his melodious voice and catchy tunes, has maintained the essence.

The second number, Eibeli Haok... is a romantic melody tuned with ecstatic pieces in lead guitar, while the third number is a Nanda Geet (Rakhe Nayane Dibaa Nishi Yashowa Nandan...) with lyrics by Manmath Baishya and tuned in traditional style with the support of dotara.

The singer has shown his talent in his rendition of both the contrasting numbers with equal skill.

The fourth number, Sinaaki Sinaaki Mor Osinaaki Mon... is apparently tuned with elements of folk music and in off-beat rhythm in percussion. The nasal intonation has added to its appeal.

Of the remaining four numbers, Ejaak Botaahe Kole... bears Angaraag’s enviable capability in dealing with both long and short notes, while in the number, Eri Thoi Ohaa Mor Oi, Luitor Paarore Oi..., the singer’s creativity in incorporating the flavour of Kamrupi folk song is clearly observed.

The other two, Jowaa Raati Aakou... and Niyor Xonaa Xandhiyaa... are bound to impress those who follow soft, romantic songs. Both in lyrics and tune, including the overall music, the songs contain a rare freshness. Angaraag effortlessly creates a soft, warm flavour.

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