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IN TODAY'S PAPER
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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Searching for Charlie
It was on my last trip to Calcutta that I went searching for the grave of Charlie Andrews. A friend had told me that it was in a cemetery on Lower Circular Road. I decided to walk there from my hotel in Park Street. Fortunately, it was winter, so the...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Bust the racket
Sir — The Telegraph’s sustained campaign against the polluting autorickshaws is much appreci ...  | Read.. 
 
Tied and tested
Sir — Of late, there have been numerous reports of physical abuse by school teachers. The recent on ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
MUTINY ABOUT BOUNTY
It is bleakly ironic, in view of the February 25 mutiny, that the Bangladesh Rifles troops are hailed as “vigilant sentinels”...| Read.. 
 
REVIEW ARTS
Banished to a forgotten corner
Ever active, involved in some aspect of theatre or the other, Rangakarmee took another step forward at its Natya Mahotsav this year by presenting three new hour-long productio...  | Read.. 
 
Unison without conviction
On Wednesday, February 11, Scotland and Seagram’s 100 Pipers in collaboration with the British Council, Calcutta, presented Samaagam, featuring the Scottish Chamber Orc...  | Read.. 
 
Different styles
Amal Ghosh and Peter Daglish are two senior artists from London who visit Calcutta quite frequently. Their media are vitreous enamel and linocut print respectively, and their ...  | Read.. 
 
Poor copies
Ganges Art Gallery’s current exhibition, Young Blood (till tomorrow), features young artists from Santiniketan. That is quite obvious from the work of Sabir Ali whose l...  | Read.. 
 
THIS ABOVE ALL
Grow old along with me
I do not subscribe to Robert Browning’s subsequent two lines in the poem, “Rabbi Ben Ezra”: “The best is yet to be/ The last ...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
The family: I believe more unhappiness comes from this source than from any other — I mean the attempt to prolong family connection unduly, and to make people hang together artificially who would never naturally do so. — SAMUEL BUTLER