TT Epaper
The Telegraph
Graphiti
 
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
CIMA Gallary
 
Email This Page
Rs 2000cr complex for titanium
- Ganjam to host first such project in India

Bhubaneswar, Oct. 15: Orissa is all set to a have India’s first integrated titanium complex to be set up at an estimated cost of more than Rs 2,000 crore.

An MoU was signed between Indo-Russian joint venture company Titanium Products Private Limited (TPPL) and the state government here today to set up the proposed titanium complex at Chhatrapur in Ganjam district.

TPPL, a joint venture between the Russian government and Saraf Group, will set up the titanium complex to manufacture 108,000 tonnes titanium slag, 68,000 tonnes high purity pig iron, 40,000 tonnes titanium dioxide pigment and finally 10,000 tonnes of titanium sponge per annum. The estimated cost of the entire project is approximately Rs 2,000 crore, said TPPL chairman S.M. Saraf, who signed the MoU on behalf of the joint venture company.

This complex is the anchor project in the sector-specific SEZ being developed by Saraf Agencies Private Limited, the main Indian promoter of TPPL, for which formal approval has been received, said he.

For the first time, Saraf Group has attempted to bring in modern, environment-friendly smelting technology from Russia to produce titanium slag from ilmenite and titanium dioxide and the highest value-added product titanium sponge, said Saraf.

Russia happens to be the world leader in production of titanium metal, regarded as the metal of the 21st century, primarily used in space research and aero-space industry.

Chief minister Naveen Patnaik, who was present at the MoU-signing ceremony, said Orissa today is at the forefront of an industrial revolution. The titanium project is also based on natural resources — the beach sand at Gopalpur, which is adding value to the products being manufactured by the Indian Rare Earth Limited. Naveen said it would create employment for 1,200 people.

The proposed project is expected to complete its first phase by early 2010.

Top
Email This Page