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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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Survival strategies

I have got an excellent job offer from a multinational company in Bangalore. But my parents are opposed to the idea of my moving into a new city. I have never stayed away from them so they think that surviving on my own in an unknown place will be an uphill task. They want me to forego this brilliant offer and look for a job in Calcutta. I have had long discussions with them on the issue but have failed to get my point across. However, I really don’t want my dreams of making big in the IT sector to be nipped in the bud. How can I assure my parents that I’m capable enough to take stock of situations in my life ?

Deepak, via e-mail

Speak to a goddamn head hunter and don’t waste my time. For a man who is supposed to be process-driven, you surely use flowery language like ‘nip in the bud’: your bud is where the problem resides son and that is what you need to course-correct. Bangalore? Does this column look like some silly travel column to you?

My nephew is six years old and is a spoilt brat. We dread the day when he comes over to our place. It’s doomsday for every object in the house. He has already broken quite a few of our favourite antique pieces that my father had picked up from an auction house. My sister has done nothing to rectify her son’s behaviour. She doesn’t believe in scolding a child.Whenever I have tried to speak to her about her son, we’ve only had heated arguments. How do I deal with this matter in an amicable manner?

Name and address withheld

Just stop inviting your sister and this silly brat or the better thing is give him a resounding slap when your sister is not looking. If he still acts smart, set your dog on him. To be frank, this is the the only way these blighters will ever learn and since your doting sister will never slap her brat, you might as well help her and us by doing the needful!

I am a 28-year-old woman in love with a very sweet boy. He loves me too and we share a great chemistry but he is extremely jealous and possessive. He has problems with me interacting with my male friends who I’ve known for years. He expects me not to go out on my own or with my buddies and instead sit at home whenever he can’t take me out. All this has been keeping me from making a long-term commitment. We’ve spoken about this and he says we should give it time and it’ll be okay and if it doesn’t we’ll go our separate ways. But I’m scared that by then I’ll be so emotionally attached that I won’t be able to take the split. I’m at a loss now. What should I do?

Suman Sinha, Calcutta

Sweet boy? Where was he born? Flurys? Silly words women use. Sweet boy! Look love, this boy is anything but sweet. He is a rascal and he will be an enduring pain. Such men are dangerous. They are possessive and will have one reason or the other to fight or to create enduring unhappiness. It is best you leave this sweet boy and go in for someone who tastes a bit tangy: that is the kind of man a flirt like you needs!        

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