The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
The state of the nation
Half a century ago, a wry joke used to make the rounds in Washington DC. It went roughly as follows: Harry Truman had already demonstrated that just about anybody could be the president of the United States of America; Dwight Eisenhower now proved so...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Sinking feeling
Sir— The fierce opposition faced by the government of West Bengal to the attempted land acquisition ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
BRIDGE TOO FAR
History can become dangerous when it comes to be laced with politics. The inane legal wrangle over whether Ram is a historica...| Read.. 
 
BIG EVENT
The story about India’s Northeast has long gone round in circles. It has all been about death and destruction caused by viole...| Read.. 
 
BONA FIDE
 
Man With A Mission
Prakash Karat will go down in modern history as a footnote for having compelled this mid-term poll that seems to be slated fo...  | Read.. 
SCRIPSI
I sit here all day trying to persuade people to do the things they ought to have sense enough to do without my persuading them...That’s all the powers of the President amount to. — HARRY TRUMAN
 
Coming soon...
Look out for the review in our Books section
BOOKS
Flowers in fire
The Solitude of Emperors By David Davidar, Penguin, Rs 495...  | Read.. 
 
The owl fell off its perch
The Observant Owl: Hootum’s Vignettes of Nineteenth-Century Calcutta By Kal...  | Read.. 
 
There for the knowing
The Rights And Wrongs of IT: The Right to Information Edited by Bhabesh D...  | Read.. 
 
History without pedagogy
The Mughal world: Life in India’s Last Golden Age By Abraham Eraly, ...  | Read.. 
 
Packaging, publicity and the hidden hand
With the exception of upmarket literature, almost all books are commissione...  | Read.. 
 

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