The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
The man kings trusted
It was Kalimpong’s flamboyant and enigmatic European Kazini who mentioned Dawa Tsering, screaming “He’s pure Chinese!” When Lyonpo Dawa (the inseparable prefix meant minister in Dzongkha, Bhutan’s language of the dzong) invited me to breakfast...  | Read.. 
 
Under the glare of a red light
Choices usually involve a price, but people persist in believing that they can avoid paying it. That is what the Indian gover...| Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Sore thumb rules
Sir — Will someone stop Amitabh Bachchan and his mindless son from making the world think that Indi ...  | Read.. 
 
Deep problems
Sir — “Cave-in alert for Barakar residence” (June 7) is a kind of news that keeps getting repeated. ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
FIRST LADY
What cricket thinks today, the State thinks tomorrow. No disrespect is intended towards the august office of the president of...| Read.. 
 
REVIEW ARTS
Songs of mystery and imagination
It would be a “mellifluent” evening, the compère had promised at the beginning of the programme, in unbelievably bad English. Well, perhaps it wasn’t as original as that, but ...  | Read.. 
 
Musical forms
Graceful curves, upright torsos and the feel of massive volume within a small frame. A touch of tenderness in one work and virility in another. The sculptures of Debabrata Cha...  | Read.. 
 
An unwise selection
Mahesh Elkunchwar wrote Party as a response to his first encounter with the artistic scene in Bombay — something new for him, a lifelong college teacher in Nagpur. What...  | Read.. 
 
Without colour
The Russians have always borne a deep affection for Indian culture. Even if their laal topi had been a...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
‘Dealing with a man,’ said the night-watchman thoughtfully, ‘is as easy as a teetotaller walking along a nice wide pavement; dealing with a woman is like the same teetotaller, after four or five whiskies, trying to get up a step that ain’t there.’ — W.W. JACOBS