The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Christopher and his kind
For an Indian, one of the most instructive things about the response of the West to 9/11 is how swiftly large sections of its liberal establishment circled their wagons against Muslims. Instructive because this manoeuvre illustrates the extent to whi...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Marriage and morals
Sir — In the article, “Sailing on a slow boat to nowhere” (Feb 1), Sumanta Sen arrives at some hast ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
GET CRACKING
One of the governmental bodies that should be asking themselves some fundamental questions following the Calcutta high court’...| Read.. 
 
BATTLE GAMES
Games should make more sense to people anywhere than guns and grenades. In Assam, however, the forthcoming National Games wer...| Read.. 
 
CHINA DIARY
 
Wash away the stain
Can a coffee shop hurt one’s national pride' Hardly had the dust died down on the appeal by some PhD students in Beijing to b...  | Read.. 
OPED
Grimy shades of green
It’s called the law of conservation of carnivals. If one gets derailed, there’s always another to take its place. The book fair was all set to begin by the end of last month, ...  | Read.. 
 
All’s well that ends well
The sage advice has always been to keep the best and discard the worst. But the Publishers and Booksellers Guild seems to have an overt reverence for the golden mean. What el...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
Love, in present-day society, is just the exchange of two imaginary pictures, and the contact of one epidermis with another. — NICOLAS-SÉBASTIEN CHAMFORT