The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Blood relations
Scheherazade, whose name meant “city-born” and who was without a doubt a big-city girl, crafty, wisecracking, by turns sentimental and cynical, as contemporary a metropolitan narrator as one could wish to meet — Scheherazade, who snared the prince in her never-ending story. ....  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Sticky wicket
Sir — It seems that the Pakistan cricket team is unable to stay clear of controversy (“Pak in perm ...  | Read.. 
 
Parting shot
Sir — For three successive years, The Telegraph has failed to remember the birthday of one o ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
IN TROUBLE
Jet Airways took off just over a decade ago; soon it made a reputation as an airline of quality. That did not seem such an ac...| Read.. 
 
NOT ALL THE WAY
To what extent can the State decide what ‘Indian society’ is, and is not, ready for' This becomes a particularly important is...| Read.. 
 
FIFTH COLUMN
 
The War Within
The Indian air force too was no exception. Its inventory continued to be virtually an extension of the Royal Air Force till t...  | Read.. 
OPED
Towards a healthy future
The author is former director-general, National Council for Applied Economic Research...  | Read.. 
 
Marauders of the dark
Our 80-year-old ancestral house always had the reputation of being haunted. Whenever I enquired about the nature of the hauntings to my grandfather, he would reply that our an...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country. — E.M. FORSTER