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A welcome for wiccans

A month after bisarjan, a western pagan cult worshipping the Mother Goddess looks set to rise from oblivion in the city.

The Wiccan Brigade, to be launched some time in mid-November by Ipsita Roy Chakraverti, will be a platform for those interested in studying wicca and using the branch of knowledge to holistic effect.

Though wicca was predominantly practised by women, Wiccan Brigade does welcome men into the fold.

“Close to 100 people, comprising professionals, some housewives and many students, have approached me on the Net to start the group. I think it’s the right time to institutionalise wicca,” says Ipsita, who was trained in the pagan cult at a chalet in the Laurentian mountains.

“Though it wouldn’t be possible to have here the kind of training we had in the Laurentians, there would be sessions on yoga and meditation, and lectures and group discussions,” explains Ipsita, whose work was recently adapted for the big screen as Sacred Evil.

The wiccan wants to restrict the first batch to around 25 through a screening process.

As part of the activities, Ipsita is drawing up plans to hold classes on the actualities of wicca. “This would include studying the social, historical, psychological and gender-related issues of wicca,” says Ipsita, seated at home overlooking the Dhakuria Lakes.

“Maybe we will invite a psychiatrist to talk on science and its relation with the esoteric. There will be sessions on physical exercises that tone up the glandular system and are also conducive to healing,” says she.

Ipsita is also planning a library to stock up esoteric books. “The website (ipsitaroy.tripod.com) will mention the books and where to look for them,” she adds.

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