The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Galbraith and India
John Kenneth Galbraith was, if not the most influential, certainly the most imposing of all American ambassadors to India. He commanded attention because of his height ' he stood six feet seven inches in his socks; his erudition ' although a professo...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Fishing in troubled waters
Sir ' The photograph of the chief minister of West Bengal, Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee, holding a hils ...  | Read.. 
 
Rule of the corrupt
Sir ' In recent times, the authorities issuing passports have been heard to make tall claims about ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
SOME MOTHERS DO HAVE 'EM
Mothers are people too. If Ms Sheila Dikshit's government in Delhi makes sure that everyone acknowledges this officially, ma...| Read.. 
 
OPED
The way out of the mire
The solution to a difficulty lies within the difficulty itself....  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
A man who wishes to impose his own opinion on others is unsure of their value. He has to uphold them by all possible means. He adopts a special tone of voice, thumps the table, smiles on some and browbeats others. In short, he borrows from his body the wherewithal to bolster up his mind. ' PAUL VAL'RY
 
PEOPLE
MAN FOR ALL SEASONS
Aamir Khan has found a new role for himself ' that of a social activist...  | Read..