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Stars are just stars

The stars and planets predestine a man’s fate, so astrologers claim. And they line up a thousand examples to assert their arguments. But the sceptics too produce a thousand examples to prove that astrology can never pass the test of scientific logic. They argue that a man’s traits have nothing to do with the position of the sun, moon and stars on the date of his birth.

This argument was further cemented recently by the publication of a joint German-Danish survey. The researchers studied more than 15,000 people and the predictions relating to them. They found there was “probably more truth in a comic strip”. Writing in an Elsevier journal, the researchers concluded, “The present large-scale study found no independent effects of sun signs, elements, or gender, and thus yields no support for the common claims of astrology.”

But astrologers have unanimously dismissed the survey by “outsiders”. Roy Gillett, president of the Astrological Association in the US, said, “This is not the first time that non-astrologers have made comments on astrology. No one would dream of doing this in other scientific areas.”

So do stars and planets really dictate our lives' We don’t think so and believe that this is largely hogwash presented by astrologers intent on peddling their “cosmic cures”.

Astrology can also be detrimental because it suppresses the human will to excel. For example, a horoscope (the blueprint of a person’s fate) may foretell that a man may never succeed in life. And a believer will stop trying to better his situation. One must not be duped. It’s an individual’s thinking, beliefs and determination that are of paramount importance. It was Mahatma Gandhi’s morality, Bill Gate’s foresight, Laxmi Mittal’s determination or Hitler’s dementia that molded some of our global elite.

Stars are just stars ' massive bodies made of very hot gases. And if distant cosmic gases can rule our daily life, astrologers will next claim that even clothes influence our life. There, of course, they may have a point. The wearer of clothes certainly modifies our philosophy of life. It’s the daily contacts with our family, friends, colleagues, peers and acquaintances that influence our behaviour, aspirations and thinking. Our social environment produces our achievements or failures. For example, Satyajit Ray’s illustrious family was responsible for the development of this great film maker, not some stars twinkling above. Therefore, stars and planets are at the most silent spectators of life. It’s human will, dedication, environment, society and a bit of luck that mould a man. The place or date of birth have no role to play. Otherwise, every child born in Mumbai on April 24, 1973 would have become a Sachin Tendulkar

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