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Wie can still walk tall
- Critics were all too quick to cut her down to size

Sunday’s heading on Ceefax was not exactly unexpected ' ‘Wie Loses Form After Landmark Cut’. Though the television service had waxed lyrical about the player following the 70 and 69 with which she made the half-way cut in the men’s SK Telecom Open, they were all too quick to cut her down to size when she failed to keep things up in the third round.

What is more, though the headline had suggested that the 16-year-old Wie had blown to something like an 80 or an 81, she in fact had nothing worse than a 74 to finish the tournament at three under par and in a share of 34th place.

To put it in context, she was only one shot worse than Charlie Wi, who won this year’s Malaysian Open, an Asian/European Tour event which featured Padraig Harrington.

The coverage of Wie’s performance in this year’s Sony Open in Hawaii at the start of this season was not too dissimilar: instead of extolling the virtues of the teenager’s second-round 68, there were factions of the press who continued to make a meal of her opening 79.

For the most part, the criticisms emanate from those who believe that Wie is guilty of running before she can walk.

“What has she ever won'” they ask, by way of justifying their point.

The answer to that is, rather more than you would think. True, she has not done as Tiger Woods in bagging a string of American junior and senior amateur championships, but she cleaned up on all fronts in Hawaii before winning the US Public Links from the grown-ups at 13.

Last year, before she turned professional, she made off with the gold medal at the Weetabix British Open ' a feat which went virtually unnoticed as she finished third in the event itself.

For one of her tender years, Wie’s overall record in the women’s majors has been nothing short of phenomenal.

At 13, after a third-round 66, she played in the last group on the last day of the Kraft Nabisco before finishing in a share of ninth place.

Since 2005, she has notched a second place in the McDonald’s LPGA Championship and two third places, the first in last year’s Weetabix and the second in this year's Kraft Nabisco.

Meanwhile, in her nine appearances in men’s events, she has had five sub-par rounds.

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

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