The Telegraph
 
 
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
Impolite predictions
The extent of Amartya Sen's learning and the depth of his understanding of issues are now part of contemporary legend. What, however, deserves mention in the same breath is his civilization. His politeness is immaculate. He would listen, with gentle ...  | Read.. 
 
Letters to the Editor
Out in the cold
Sir ' The crisis in Karnataka, which has left Dharam Singh's government tottering on the brink of a ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL
TAKING OVER
The path to liberalization is not often a perfectly straight one in India. Recent developments in Tamil Nadu, for instance, l...| Read.. 
 
ONLY WITH FORCE
The army in control of a curfew-bound city and its empty streets evoke images from a battle. Nepal's King Gyanendra would be ...| Read.. 
 
FIFTH COLUMN
 
Back to square one
Wars only end when one side wins, or both sides conclude that they can't gain any more by fighting. Neither side can actually...  | Read.. 
OPED
Irrelevance of the king
The slogan, 'Gyane Chor, Desh Chhod' (Gyanendra thief, leave the country), shows the distance the Nepalese people have travelled from venerating their monarch as...  | Read.. 
 
Big trouble for the little ones
The concern is with children who are denied their childhood and a future, who work at too young an age, who work long hours for low wages, who work under conditions harmful to...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
It was not the matter of the work, but the mind that went into, that counted ' and the man who was not content to do small things well would leave great things undone. ' ELLEN ANDERSON GHOLSON GLASGOW